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20121202
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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
think the fiscal cliff uncertainty is going to continue t actually. so i'm a little more bearish in the near term. then i think it's a sell-off, if there is one, that should be bought aggressively for a rally in the end of 2013 that would be the beginning of a new bull market. >> when you say a rally towards the end of next year, do you think over the course of 2013 it's going to end higher? we're going to be higher than where we are right now? >> yeah, i mean, i think ultimately 2013 ends up higher at the end. i think we're going to go -- we're going to test some lower resistance in the first six, seven months of the year. we have so much uncertainty in washington. we do have slowing economies in europe and in the u.s. >> right. david, what do you say right now? break the tie for us. >> break the tie. in the near term, there's an epic tug of war between extremely aggressive monetary easing and just total disdain for what they're doing in washington on tax and regulatory policy. in the near term, the fiscal cliff prevails. in the longer term, the fed will prevail. there's so much
it comes to the fiscal cliff. but tim geithner just told cnbc that we're going to go over the cliff unless tax rates go up. at the same time, two dozen republican house members signed a bipartisan letter with democrats defecting from the boehner plan. in the meantime, a nice game for the day for the dow, but a stunning selloff for apple. do you know what? fiscal cliff or not, the s&p 500 is up 12% year to date. that is a handsome gain for investors, an optimistic year, believe it or not. and we already bailed out detroit's auto industry. but now, at least one motown politician is telling president obama he should bail out detroit bankrupt city government, too. this sure isn't the free market, and i asked why should a texas taxpayer bail out detroit? >>> breaking news from syria, and it is a blockbuster. the assad regime is walking and loading its chemical weapons, ready to use them on its own people. nbc's chief pentagon correspondent joins us now. jim, is this the red line president obama was warning about? >> well, not quite yet. u.s. officials tell us that the syrian military is poised
to the edge of the fiscal cliff. instead of reforming the tax code, the president wants to raise tax rates. even if the president that the tax rate hike that he wanted, understand that we will continue to see trillion dollar deficits for as far as the eye can see. washington has a spending3 problem, not a revenue problem. if the president does not agree with our proposal, i believe he has an obligation to families and small businesses to offer a plan of his own. we are ready and eager to talk to the president about such plan. >> you did speak with the president earlier this week, can you characterize that call. also, it has to be increases in rates for the wealthy or no deal. >> the phone call was pleasant, but more of the same. it is time for the president to be serious and come back with a counter offer. [inaudible question] >> the risk the president wants us to take, increasing tax rates will hit many small businesses that produce 60-70% of the new jobs in our country. that is the whole issue. [inaudible question] >> i think that is reckless talk. [inaudible question] >> listen, raising
it anymore -- fiscal cliff is? today we got an incredible employment report from the labor department. with 146,000 new jobs. i was looking for 90,000. the unemployment rate dropping to 7.7. i thought it might be 8%. and all this despite the effects of hurricane sandy. who knows how high we could have been if it weren't for that darn hurricane? yet the market barely blinked. yet the potential layoffs if we go over the cliff make these rearview numbers seem almost irrelevant to the market. hence the mixed performance of the averages today. sure, dow gained 81 points, but the s&p barely budged, edging up 29%. and the nasdaq actually declined .38%, led once again by the slip sliding away apple, which you know i like, but how many times during a particular show can i say i like it? so with that in mind, what's the game plan for next week? first off, perhaps the most important day of the week is monday. but not for any earnings. not for any releases. that's when we process the results of the weekend talk shows, which you now have to watch as if we were instead of watching, you know, colleg
a moment. we do want to begin with the markets and that looming fiscal cliff. the dow finishing november lower for the second consecutive month. the blue chips falling half a percent in november. and #% sinnasdaq and s&p did fi higher last month. six out of ten sectors managed to post a gain. consumer discretionary stocks up the most. utilities the biggest losers. and while individual trading sessions may have been choppy, it was another month of low volatility. the vix remained below 20 for the fourth consecutive month and that's the longest streak since february of 2007. a big part of the market story has obviously been a big topic dominating the sunday talk shows. tim geithner arguing republicans need make the next move in negotiations. >> republicans have said that they don't like those reforms or they would like to do more. and if that's true, then they should tell us what they would like as an alternative. build on those, tell us how. but we can't react to anything until we see the details of the proposal and we need it on the rates and revenue side as well as on the spending side.
on in town. in washington news, both parties hinting at renewed talks on the fiscal cliff. the acknowledgement of open lines of communication passed for encouraging news. a new survey finds more than 60% of leading investment professionals predict a shorp stock decline in the market if the government fails to come up with a deal. in this case defined as a more than 10% drop in the dow. 56% surveyed foresee a deal to avoid the cliff by year end, 44% predict failure in the ongoing negotiations. as for corporate america, through yesterday's close, there have been # 70 announcements of special dividends. these special difference deebds are valueded a more than $30.1 billion. among the latest names, mcgraw hill will pay a special dividends of $2.50 a share before year end. and drop its previously announced plan to buy back up to $200 million more of stock this year. >> everybody's paid their dividends this year, so they won't be paying them next year. >> this is a major issue. what's going to happen is -- we have two great economists onset. but that money will get annualized, s
and knock me out. apple. if we're going off the fiscal cliff, we know capital gains tax rates are going higher, right? right? that's obvious. do you really think the republicans have the power to keep those capital gains rates down? apple's become a referendum on the president's power and polling. right now he has the upper hand, then he can really roll them and intends to do so. it's reasonable to take some profits so you can pay the tax man less now rather than more later. it's a wimpy thing, it's logical, makes perfect economic sense. especially if you hold apple. so the stock gets hammered. it makes sense to sell it. but let's be less emotional and even clinical about this one. first, divide apple's share price by ten, now you have a stock that got crushed down to $54. when you do that arithmetic, it isn't all that scary, is it? where does the pessimism fit in? when we have to endure the pin the tail on the selloff game, what excuses for the selloff, myriad alibis i hear from today's action. apple's losing share to google, it doesn't have the right phones in europe, nokia's making a
're fiscal cliff cliff fatigued to death. it's a real turnoff and we know it, but i want to address the issue in big picture terms with you because you're big picture thinker. i think at the end of the day we will have higher taxes on wealthy people, promises to cut spending somewhere down the road and don't worry about the debt, ignore it it. i think that's the outline of a big picture deal. what do you say? >> i sort of agree, stuart. there will be higher taxes. i do think the republicans will extract a couple of entitle reformat. a new way to calculate the cost of living adjustment and social security, maybe a higher payment by beneficiaries who are wealthier in medicare and finally the last point you make is the really intriguing one, that's the debt ceiling. and my hunch is the republicans will cave on taxes and they'll come back to fight again later in the winter on the debt ceiling and they could really extract major spending cuts by late winter. >> so you don't think the president will get the blank check that he wants, no debt ceiling? he wants no debt ceiling, you don't think he'll
about the potential impact of the fiscal cliff, i want to give you stocks that you can fall back on in a declining market. many strong companies, high yields. let me introduce you to weingarten, a company i've liked since '85. owns shopping centers all over the u.s. 301 income-producing properties and 11 more in various stages of development. they have a yield, doesn't have a lot of leverage. company recently sold off the portfolio of industrial assets to become a pure play on retail, and 70% of the rent it collects comes from tenants that are effectively internet resistant. they say it in their own papers. meaning they're immunized against online competition. things like supermarkets, restaurants, personal care supervisors. 93.6% occupancy rate up 200 basis points year-over-year. very bullish guidance. let's check in with drew alexander, the president and ceo of weingarten reality investors. how are you? >> pleasure. great to be here. >> now, we obviously are all very focused on the notion that washington could get us back into a great recession if they're not careful. and one o
move closer and closer to the fiscal cliff everyone will be keeping an eye out on a big deal or could we see a big tax hike. only three weeks before we possibly go over. david: wonder if we trade the guns to avoid a deal for the fiscal cliff. lauren: you're onto something. david: maybe. i don't think they would go for that. "money" with melissa francis is coming next. melissa: i'm melissa francis. here is what is money tonight. a huge break through for u.s. natural gas. a key government study could open the door for exports and create a boom for the economy. the only thing standing in the way though is president obama. we'll drill down with a natural gas company's ceo. >>> plus fighting crazy with crazy. could two plat nurm coins worth a trillion dollars each solve our debt crisis? is it as nuts as it sounds? bear with me here, people. our "money" power panel will break it down. >>> are plastic bags on the way to extinction. they're completely banned in two cities. chicago wants to nix them. guess who is behind it? my favorite chicago alderman. i say stop the madness. but alderman joe
the fiscal cliff and about further risks from eurozone financial crisis? go . >> we know the markets are driven on a minute by minute basis, but if we just step back from that, the chances that in two to three months from now, obviously we could briefly go over in january, i think that's unlikely, the chance that we'll really have the u.s. economy squeeze by 4%, 5% of gdp, i think it's incredibly unlikely. >> what are you assuming about the ongoing eurozone -- >> the eurozone, if we go through a series of ticks, we have had a lot of progress this year. you have to be clear about that. and not just with all the various government actions. look at wages in greece and now spain. wages in greece are down more than 25%. very painful, but we've heard about the pain already. what we haven't heard so much about is the competitiveness. >> enor husband costs with incredibly high unemployment rates. >> that i'm afraid is what's going on and that's extremely unpleasant. what i'm saying in terms of market action is we know about that, we're focused already on the unemployment, we're not focused o
up to the scal cliff. december consumer sentiment nosedid to a five-year high, because of fiscal cliff fears. a spike in taxes would leave a lot less money lying aroundor the iphone or ipad. shares of apple fell 2%. >>> thanks to a study by the department of energy the u.s. may be closer to approve natural gas exports. data shows it could improve th economy by $47 billion in 2020. we need that. sounds like a win-win. we have the ceo of bright link oil and gas. chris, thanks for joining us. >> thank you. melissa: what do you make of this report? first of all, do you buy it? do you think it's possible? >> i dohink it's psible and i'm glad to see it come out. what it really does now it shows overhe 12 different enarios that the government study investiged each one of those scenarios came back and said america will benefit and have a positive economic gai if we export lng offshore to europe, and or asia and to other countries that need our gas. melissa: we have so much natural gas unlocked as a result of fracking, the problem is, intellectually, emotionally we can never wrap our head
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)